falling in love with a 35mm format in the digital age.

There's something  in analog film camera that cannot be reproduced or replicated by digital camera, I shall leave all the technicalities outside as I am not in such a place to be telling you that. 

The first ever memory I ever had with a camera was possibly when I traveled with my family during my younger years, around 7 - 10 i assume. I can recalled being given a disposable Kodak film camera on every single trip, my sisters and I would empty the whole roll in a couple of days. I can remember that cracking noise when you wind after a shot, that tiny plastic shutter sound. I'll possibly be able to dig up some old photos in the near future when my mum is free to assist me by identifying which pictures were taken by me.

Fast forward to today and I have a Voigtlander Bessa R3A resting its black solid body on my hand. I've purchased this camera for nearly 6 months now. It was quite an impulsive moment and not much of a story behind it rather than tracking down a shop that sells it, walk in there and buy one.

That very afternoon I purchased two rolls of cheap Kodak films and went crazy with my brand new rangefinder. 

Prior to this, I didn't understand why some people still using film cameras when digital cameras are much more accessible and user friendly. It's cheaper to use and you can learn from your mistakes right then and there. But after I've been using my Bessa for a while, I started to understand that there's something with film cameras that cannot be found in digital cameras.

A film camera makes you think more about when what you shoot and how you compose your photo. Each picture has to mean something as you can't go all gun blazing super burst mode on it (well you can but it does cost a fair bit to develop). I learned that I should be patient and wait for the right decisive moment (Thank you Cartier-Bresson). A constant reminder to totally focus on your surrounding, to be ready at any moment  and be able to focus on your subject, compose, shoot. 

When I came back to my trusty X100s or my 6D, I feel more confident with my composition and pretty much everything. 

Every photographer who grew up like myself in the digital age should try shooting with the good old film. It will definitely help you to grow into a better photographer. 

Oh and that magic of film, when you got suck into it. There's no turning back. 

A slight burn from an exposed part near the leading

A slight burn from an exposed part near the leading

the imperfection of film has that human quality, life is far from what we are forced to see today. 

the imperfection of film has that human quality, life is far from what we are forced to see today.